An Introduction to Stem Courses and Careers Through a Brief Historical Narrative of the Tuskegee Movable School

An Introduction to Stem Courses and Careers Through a Brief Historical Narrative of the Tuskegee Movable School

Movable School

The Tuskegee Movable School (c) 1920s

What an auspicious occasion! I have been published in the esteemed Black History Bulletin.   You will find my article entitled “An Introduction to Stem Course and Careers Through a Brief Historical Narrative of the Tuskegee Movable School.” My article discusses students situating themselves in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math majors through the lens of history and identifying with historical figures.  You may read the abstract here,

“How do students view history and science? Do students see history and science as disparate and distinct or connected and dependent? Further, do students see themselves in said history and science? It is paramount in today’s educational climate that students gain an inclusive, culturally diverse, and connected view of history and science as America places a new focus on study and careers in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM).”

I am very humbled yet excited about this recognition of my research and the opportunity to be published in a Peer Reviewed journal! I also encourage you to learn more about the Black History Bulletin and Association for the Study of African American Life and History.   Helen R. Houston provides us this succinct description in the Encyclopedia of African American Education,

“The Negro History Bulletin was founded in October 1937 at the urging of Mary McLeod Bethune, president of the Association for the Study of Negro Life (later to be known as the Association for the Study of African American Life and History [ASALH]). It was the brainchild of Carter G. Woodson, often called the “father of Black history,” who had created the ASALH in 1915 to promote African American history. The last issue of the Negro History Bulletin was published in 2000, but it continues as the Black History Bulletin.”

Onward!!!

Carter G. Woodson

Carter Godwin Woodson (December 19, 1875 – April 3, 1950)[1] was an African-American historian, author, journalist and the founder of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History. Woodson was one of the first scholars to study African-American history. A founder of Journal of Negro History, Woodson has been cited as the father of black history.[2]

Mary Jane McLeod Bethune (July 10, 1875 – May 18, 1955) was an American educator and civil rights leader best known for starting a school for African-American students in Daytona Beach, Florida, that eventually became Bethune-Cookman University and for being an advisor to President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Mary Jane McLeod Bethune (July 10, 1875 – May 18, 1955) was an American educator and civil rights leader best known for starting a school for African-American students in Daytona Beach, Florida, that eventually became Bethune-Cookman University and for being an advisor to President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

 

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